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Malus sp.

Crabapples

Family Rosaceae


Use
Jams and jellies. Some varieties can be eaten raw,
although most are too tart and hard. Some can be used to make cider.


Description

Growth Form: Small tree.

Leaves: 5-10cm (2-4in) long, simple, ovate, saw-toothed, some varieties with wavy edges, many with hairy leaves.

Leaf (Emily Silver. Brandeis University, Waltham, MA)
Leaves

Flowers ((c) Dan L. Perlman/EcoLibrary.org)
Flowers,
(c) Dan L. Perlman/ EcoLibrary.org

Flowers: 2.5-5cm (1-2in) wide, 5 petals, pink or white, in clusters. March-May.

Fruits: 2.5-3cm (1-1.25in) across, green to yellowish to reddish.

Bark: Red-brown, ridged and scaly.

Bark (Emily Silver. Brandeis University, Waltham, MA)
Bark

Habitat and Range

Mesic soils in old fields, fencerows, edges of forest. Different varieties found throughout eastern US.

Season

Fruits can be harvested late summer and fall.

Fun Facts

Crabapple varieties are commonly planted as an ornamental for its beautiful flowers.

Tree in bloom ((c) Dan L. Perlman/EcoLibrary.org. Brandeis University, Waltham, MA)
Tree in bloom,
(c) Dan L. Perlman/ EcoLibrary.org

Fruit (Emily Silver. Brandeis University, Waltham, MA)
Fruit

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