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Quercus alba

White Oak

Family Fagaceae


Use
Raw, Cooked, Flour. The acorns of White Oaks are sweet enough to be eaten raw. They can also be boiled, roasted, or dried and ground into a meal used for baking.



Description

Growth Form: Tree growing up to 23 meters tall and 0.3-0.9 meters in diameter.

Leaves: 5.1 - 22.8 centimeters. Long, evenly lobed. No bristle tips at end of lobes.

 


White Oak (Emily Silver, Waltham MA)
Leaves


White Oak (Photo courtesy of Dan L. Perlman and ecolibrary.org)
Nuts
Photo by Dan L. Perlman (www.ecolibrary.org)


Fruits:
Medium sized Acorn. Cap is bowl-shaped and covers less than 1/3 of the acorn. Caps have prominent bumps.

Buds: Hairy and without scales.

Bark: Light-colored. Slightly furrowed and sometimes scaled.


Habitat and Range

Dry or moist soil. Minnesota to Maine. As far south as Texas and Florida.

Season

Early Fall.


White Oak (Hannah Ramer, Waltham MA)
Bark



Fun Facts

Over 180 wildlife species have been reported to use white oak acorns for food. White oak can live for 3-5 centuries.

 

 
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