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Lindera benzoin

Spicebush

Family Lauraceae


Use
Tea, Seasoning. The young leaves, bark, and twigs can be boiled for tea in about 15 minutes.



Description

Growth Form: Small tree or shrub.

Leaves: 2-6 inches. Aromatic when crushed. Thin, elliptical, toothless and almost hairless.

 


Spicebush (Emily Silver, Waltham MA)
Leaves


Spicebush (Emily Silver, Waltham MA)
Whole Plant


Flowers:
Clusters of yellow flowers precede leaves in the spring. Have a spicy scent.

Fruits: Oval red berry with a single seed inside.

Buds: Small, reddish brown, round, and with slight scales.

Bark: Light brown. Can be smooth to rough.


Habitat and Range

Damp woods, stream banks, wetland areas. Southeast Kansas, Iowa, Southern Michigan, Southern Ontario, Southwest Maine, south to Texas and Florida.

Season

Leaves harvested in spring or summer. The fruits can be harvested late summer to early fall.


Spicebush (Emily Silver, Waltham MA)
Fruits


Spicebush (Emily Silver, Waltham MA)
Bark


Fun Facts

The berries can be substituted for allspice when dried and powdered

 

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