Fall Wildflowers of New England
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Tawny Cottongrass
Eriophorum virginicum
F. Cyperacea
General Description:

Tawny Cottongrass is a monocotyledonous flowering plant categorized by botanists as a sedge. Tawny cottongrass inhabits bogs and wetland areas. The erect stems can be over one meter in height. Stems are smooth with triangular cross-sections. This species grows both singularly and in clumps from shared rootstocks and is found on bog mats and in wetland habitats.

Asdepias syricacia
Flowers:

The flowers appear at or near the end of the stem in cottony tufts. Tufts can be either white or coppery in hue and have long, slender bristles like a cotton ball.

Fruit:

The seeds are copper or brown in color, approximately three times as long as they are wide with many white bristles.

Leaves:

Tawny Cottongrass leaves are very narrow and flat with rough margins.

Habitat:

This cottongrass inhabits wetland ecosystems, favoring the saturated conditions of bogs and swampy areas.

Fun Facts:

The Tawny Cottongrass can propagate via both its rootstocks and its seeds. This species commonly invades poorly drained areas such as old cranberry bogs, where it is often considered a destructive weed. .

Asdepias syricacia
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