Fall Wildflowers of New England
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Queen Anne's Lace
Daucus carota
F. Apiaceae
General Description:

Queen anne's lace is a relatively tall plant measuring approximately 30-100 cm. in height. This well known wildflower is easily identified by its flat-topped cluster of small, white flowers and fern-like leaves. The leaves and stem produce a carrot odor when crushed.

Daucus carota
Flowers:

The miniscule, radially symmetrical flowers of queen anne's lace are arranged in flat-topped compound umbels that measure approximately 7.5-12.5 cm in width. The flowers are creamy-white; however, each compound umbel also has a conspicuous, dark purple flower at its center. Each flower has rounded petals of varying size and is supported by three disproportionately long, dark green, thin, tapered sepals.

Fruit:

The fruit is small and bristled.

Leaves:

The leaves are long, measuring 5-20 cm. in length and are fern-like, having deep sinuses and multiple lobes.

Habitat:

Queen anne's lace grows best in dry fields and around waste areas.

Fun Facts:

Queen anne's lace belongs the carrot family. Consequently, the leaves and stem give off a carrot odor when crushed.

Also named wild carrot, queen anne's lace long, first-year taproot (equivalent to the orange, edible portion of the commercial carrot) can be cooked and eaten.

Queen anne's lace, although considered a troublesome weed, is popularly used for flower arranging.

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