Fall Wildflowers of New England
HOME GLOSSARY ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
SEARCH BY NAME SEARCH BY COLOR SEARCH BY ARRANGEMENT
Red Clover,
Trifolium pretense
F. Fabaceae
General Description:

This common and highly visible wildflower is relatively small, measuring 15-60 cm. in height. This wildflower is most easily recognized by its dense, dome-shaped flower cluster, comprised of numerous, long, bilaterally symmetrical, pink flowers. Flower clusters are arranged singularly atop the terminal shoot. The leaflets are small deep green, textured, and have a light green, V-shaped smudge in the center.

Trifolium pretense
Flowers:

The pink, bilaterally symmetrical flowers are small long, and tubular, measuring 1.5 cm in length. The flower petals form the characteristic pea flower: a lower keel, formed by two fused lower petals and two upper wings, modified lateral petals. Petals are curved upward and are arranged in a dome-shaped cluster, measuring 1.5-2.5 cm. in width, and positioned atop the terminal shoot.

Fruit:

The fruit are pod-like with a singular seed.

Leaves:

The leaflets are small, measuring 1.5-5 cm. in length and rounded. They are covered in thin down, are textured and are deep green with a light green, V-shaped smudge in its center.

Habitat:

Red clover is very persistent and grows best in old fields, lawns, along roadsides and in all other similar environments.

Fun Facts:

Red Clover was introduced from Europe as a hay and pasture crop.

Like all members of the Pea family, red clover has nitrogen-producing root nodules, so is extremely useful for crop rotation.

Trifolium pretense
Trifolium pretense
HOME GLOSSARY ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
SEARCH BY NAME SEARCH BY COLOR SEARCH BY ARRANGEMENT