Fall Wildflowers of New England
HOME GLOSSARY ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
SEARCH BY NAME SEARCH BY COLOR SEARCH BY ARRANGEMENT
Spatulate-leaved Sundew
Drosera intermedia
F. Droseraceae
General Description:

Spatulate-leaved sundew is a low lying plant that measures approximately 10-22.5 cm. in height, and is most easily identified by its unique, sticky leaves. The radially symmetrical flowers are white and grow out of a leafless stalk from the side of the base of the plant. Leaves are spoon-shaped and are arranged as a basal rosette.

Drosera intermedia leaves.
Flowers:

The flowers are small, measuring approximately 6mm. in width. These radially symmetrical blooms have five stamens and three styles, surrounded by five rounded, white petals and supported by five green sepals. Flowers are arranged in an elongated cluster along one side of a leafless stalk.

Fruit:

The capsule-like fruit contains many seeds..

Leaves:

The unique leaves are spoon-shaped and long, measuring 1.5 cm. in length, with long petioles. Characteristic of the sundew family, the oblong leaf heads are covered with glandular hairs that exude a sticky substance. Leaves are arranged in a basal rosette.

Habitat:

Spatulate-leaved sundew grows best in peat bogs.

Fun Facts:

Spatulate-leaved sundew is a carnivorous plant. The sticky substance excreted by the leaf hairs trap insects and digest them for nutrition.

Spatulate-leaved sundew is a short lived, perennial herb.

Its genus name comes form the Greek word droseros, meaning watery or dewy, and refers to the dewy substance excreted by the leaves

Drosera intermedia leaf with drops of sticky fluid emerging from its red glandular hairs to entrap insects.
Drosera intermedia bud.
Drosera intermedia flower (photo courtesy of Professor Dan Perlman).
HOME GLOSSARY ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
SEARCH BY NAME SEARCH BY COLOR SEARCH BY ARRANGEMENT