Seminars

Upcoming Seminars / Seminars This Week

Tue 3/31/15 12:30 pmGerstenzang 121
Neurobiology Journal Club
Aryn Gittis '01 (Carnegie-Mellon University)
Opposing Behaviors Driven by Optogenetic Activation of Neuronal Subpopulations in the GPe
Hosted by Leslie Griffith

Tue 3/31/15 12:45 pmGoldsmith 226
Combinatorics Seminar
Jiaqi Gu
Algorithms for generating permutations and sorting permutations

Tue 3/31/15 2 pmGoldsmith 226
Topology Seminar
Tara Brendle (Brandeis)
Combinatorial models for mapping class groups

Tue 3/31/15 3:30 pmGoldsmith 226
Everytopic Seminar
Charles Smart (MIT)
The Abelian sandpile on periodic Euclidean graphs

Tue 3/31/15 4 pmAbelson 131
Physics Department Colloquium
Daniel Prober (Yale University)
Graphene Nanobolometers for Ultrasensitive Far-Infrared Detection
Graphene has recently been proposed as an ultrasensitive THz photon detector for space-based astronomy observations. We have studied the thermal properties of monolayer graphene for this application, and done extensive modeling of the detection processes. One would employ superconducting contacts to achieve energy confinement in the graphene. Recently we have studied experimentally the energy loss processes in graphene down to T = 0.1 K. The space-based observatories that could employ such detectors will be discussed, as well as the science that can be done with these observatories.

Hosted by Prof. Bulbul Chakraborty

Wed 4/1/15 10 amGeller Conference Room, Hassenfeld Center
Thesis Seminar (Graduate Program in Psychology)
Danielle Gianferante (Psychology)
Age and Sex Differences in Glucocorticoid Sensitivity of Pro-inflammatory Cytokine production after repeated psychosocial stress
Many diseases are associated with chronic inflammation, including cardiovascular disease, psychiatric illness, and autoimmune diseases. These maladies, which impact society greatly, develop across the lifespan and differ both in occurrence and prognosis between men and women. Therefore, it is important to understand factors that may precipitate these diseases, and explain the sex difference, such as dysregulation of the inflammatory system. The HPA axis is a major regulator of peripheral inflammation, and is stress responsive. Glucocorticoids (GC's), which are the end-products of HPA axis activation, down-regulate inflammation. However, the relationship between GC's and inflammatory markers are not consistent; for example, patients with autoimmune disorders can have normal glucocorticoid levels. This could be due to changes in sensitivity of inflammation to GC's, such as cortisol. Because the HPA axis is stress responsive, and many diseases are precipitated by or exacerbated by stress, studying GC sensitivity in the context of stress response patterns may explain discrepancies in both the relationship between the HPA axis and inflammation, as well as health disparities across age and sex groups. To study this relationship, participants were exposed to repeated psychosocial stress on two days. Three stress reactivity systems were assessed. Analysis of cortisol response patterns across age groups and between genders revealed significant effects of both age and sex, with middle-aged women failing to show a cortisol response to stress on either day of testing. Interleukin-6 was measured as a marker of inflammation, and age by sex analyses revealed that men showed a pattern of cortisol habituation, whereas women did not. In vitro measurements of GC sensitivity using a dexamethasone suppression test were also analyzed. There was an effect of age in women, but not men, indicating that middle aged women show a pattern of increasing GC resistance on both study days. These results reveal possibly maladaptive stress response patterns in middle aged women that could predispose them to autoimmune disease via dysregulation of inflammatory processes. Taken together, this project provides a framework for examining relationships between different stress reactivity systems. GC sensitivity could be a valuable mediator of the relationship between the HPA axis and inflammatory processes.

Wed 4/1/15 12 noonShapiro Science Center 1-03 Library
Bridging the Two Cultures Lecture Series (Special Seminar)
Eric Chasalow
Open to Faculty Only

Wed 4/1/15 4 pmGerstenzang 121
Joint Biology/Neuroscience Colloquium
Eric Lai (MSKCC)
Adaptive gene regulation by testis-restricted miRNAs and siRNAs
Hosted by Nelson Lau

Thu 4/2/15 12 noonLurias, Hassenfeld Conference Center
Psychology Department Colloquium (NIGMS Brain, Body & Behavior Training Grant NIA Cognitive Aging in social context Training Grant)
Martica Hall, Ph.D. (Professor of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Clinical and Translational Science, University of Pittsburgh)
Sleep: A Critical yet Understudied Component of Behavioral Medicine
Dr. Hall will give an overview of her research program, which bridges the traditionally independent fields of behavioral medicine and sleep medicine. Her research focuses on the pathways through which psychological and social factors affect sleep and their downstream consequences to health and functioning, with an emphasis on cardiometabolic disease risk. She will first describe the conceptual model that underlies her research program and will then review the extent to which her own work has supported, refuted and extended this model. She will conclude by highlighting novel extensions of her work conducted by trainees in her laboratory including graduate and medical students as well as post-doctoral fellows.

Hosted by Jutta Wolf

Thu 4/2/15 3 pmGerstenzang 121
Special Seminar (Biochemistry-Biophysics )
Donald Hilvert (Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, ETH Zčrich, Zurich, Switzerland)
Design and Optimization of Artificial Enzymes: Nearer to Nature
Coffee & Cookies Provided
Hosted by Doro Kern

Thu 4/2/15 4 pmAbelson 229
MRSEC Seminar
Nesrin Senbil (UMASS Amherst Dept of Physics )
How contact line deforms around a sphere at a liquid interface: Effect of interface shape, roughness
When a particle adsorbs at a liquid interface, the liquid wets the solid surface of the particle and creates a 1-D boundary. This boundary, contact line around the particle, adopts itself depending on shape of the liquid interface. In our system, the simplest shape, a sphere is used to study the contact line deformation at different liquid interface shapes. At a planar liquid interface, contact line around the sphere is circular when the roughness is insignificant. However, when the shape of the liquid interface is anisotropic, such as cylindrical liquid interface, deformation of the contact line is observed. Magnitude of the quadrupolar component depends on anisotropy of the liquid interface, vertical forces on the sphere, contact radius and roughness of the sphere. Moreover, advancing and receding contact angles of the sphere are measured at anisotropic liquid interfaces. Our results show that apparent receding angle decreases as the anisotropy of the liquid interface increases, repeatedly. Contact angle and contact line of a particle is one of the key parameters that affect its interaction with the neighboring particles at the interface. Thus, those results are important for self-assembly and capillarity related problems.
Hosted by Seth Fraden

Thu 4/2/15 4:30 pmGoldsmith 317
Joint Mathematics Colloquium
Xianfeng David Gu (SUNY Stony Brook)
Discrete Surface Uniformization Theorem and Its Applications
Tea Served at 4:00pm

Fri 4/3/15 10 amAbelson 131
Thesis Seminar (Graduate Program in Neuroscience)
Jaime Devine (Wolf Lab)
Sleep Behavior Associations with the Cortisol Awakening Response and Health

Fri 4/3/15 11 am
Biochemistry-Biophysics Friday Lunchtime Pizza Talks
( )
No seminar, Good Friday

Fri 4/3/15 12:30 pmGerstenzang 123
Molecular and Cell Biology & Neuroscience Student Seminars (Friday Graduate Student Seminars Pizza Talks)
Jacqueline McDermott (Paradis Lab)

Mon 4/6/15 11 amVolen 201
Computational Neuroscience Journal Club
Timothy Rumbell (Mount Sinai School of Medicine)
TBA
Hosted by Paul Miller and Eve Marder

Mon 4/6/15 12 noonRosenstiel 118
Molecular Genetics Journal Club
Anna Kazatskaya (Sengupta Lab)
Deacetylation of nuclear LC3 drives autophagy initiation under starvation
Sal Alioto (Goode Lab)
Inter-Cellular Forces Orchestrate Contact Inhibition of Locomotion

Mon 4/6/15 4 pmGerstenzang 121
Chemistry Department Colloquium
( )
No Colloquium: Spring Recess

Tue 4/7/15 11 amAbelson 333
Thesis Seminar (Graduate Program in Molecular and Cell Biology)
Nate Tompkins (Fraden Lab)
Synchronization Dynamics of Coupled Chemical Oscillators

Tue 4/7/15 12:30 pm
Neurobiology Journal Club
( )
No Journal Club: Spring Recess

Tue 4/7/15 12:45 pmGoldsmith 226
Combinatorics Seminar
( )
No Seminar: Spring Recess

Tue 4/7/15 2 pmGerstenzang 121
Thesis Seminar (Graduate Program in Molecular and Cell Biology)
Scott Neal (Sengupta Lab)
Neural and molecular mechanisms of sensory signal integration in Caenorhabditis elegans

Tue 4/7/15 2 pmGoldsmith 226
Topology Seminar
( )
No Seminar: Spring Recess

Tue 4/7/15 3:30 pmGoldsmith 226
Everytopic Seminar
( )
No Seminar: Spring Recess

Tue 4/7/15 4 pm
Physics Department Colloquium
( )
No Colloquium: Spring Recess

Wed 4/8/15 12 noon
IGERT Computational Neuroscience Seminar
( )
No Seminar: Spring Recess

Wed 4/8/15 4 pmGerstenzang 121
Joint Biology/Neuroscience Colloquium
( )
No Colloquium: Spring Recess

Thu 4/9/15 12 noon
Psychology Department Colloquium
( )
No Colloquium: Spring Recess

Fri 4/10/15 11:15 amAbelson 131
Biochemistry-Biophysics Friday Lunchtime Pizza Talks
( )
No Seminar: Spring Recess

Fri 4/10/15 12:30 pmGerstenzang 123
Molecular and Cell Biology & Neuroscience Student Seminars
Gonen Memisoglu (Haber Lab)
Stephen Alkins (Griffith Lab)

Fri 4/10/15 2:30 pmGerstenzang 121
Thesis Seminar (Graduate Program in Chemistry)
Solen Ekesan (Herzfeld Lab)
Reactive Force Fields with Pseudo-Classical Electrons

Mon 4/13/15
String Theory Seminar
No Seminar Today

Mon 4/13/15 4 pmGerstenzang 121
Chemistry Department Colloquium
Dr. Jeffrey Miller (Purdue University )
In Situ and Operando X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy in Catalysis: Single-Site Heterogeneous Catalysts for Propane Dehydrogenation
Hosted by Christine Thomas

Mon 4/13/15 4 pmGerstenzang 123
Rosenstiel Award Lecture
Frederick Alt, '71 (Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Director, Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine Boston Children's Hospital Charles A. Janeway Professor of Pediatrics Professor of Genetics Harvard Medical School)
Antibody Maturation, Genomic Rearrangements and Cancer
Hosted by James E. Haber

Tue 4/14/15 2 pmGoldsmith 226
Topology Seminar
Shelly Harvey (Brandeis)
A rational valued metric on the knot concordance group coming from gropes

Tue 4/14/15 3:30 pmGoldsmith 226
Everytopic Seminar
Alison Miller (Harvard)
Classical knot invariants, arithmetic invariant theory, and counting simple (4q+1)-knots

Tue 4/14/15 4 pmAbelson 131
Physics Department Colloquium
Paul Townsend (Cambridge University)
TBA

Wed 4/15/15 2 pmGerstenzang 123
15th Annual Alberta Gotthardt Strage '56 and Henry Strage Award for Aspiring Young Science Faculty (Special Seminar)
Isaac Krauss (Chemistry Department, Brandeis)
Combining Organic Synthesis and Directed Evolution to Design Carbohydrate Cluster HIV Vaccine Candidates
This lecture will describe the use of in vitro evolution to develop molecules in which carbohydrates are arrayed in patterns that mimic the carbohydrate surface of the HIV virus. The carbohydrate surface of the HIV virus is a viable target for antibody binding and neutralization; thus, synthetic carbohydrate molecules which mimic this surface have promise as vaccines. Our laboratory has developed two in vitro evolution techniques for creating optimal arrays of carbohydrates. In the first method, termed SELMA (SELection of Modified Aptamers), carbohydrates are attached to trillions of randomly-shaped scaffolds composed of DNA, generating a diverse population of carbohydrate clusters. The most HIV-like carbohydrate clusters are then fished out of the pool using an HIV-neutralizing antibody as bait. In the second method, Glycopeptide mRNA Display, carbohydrates are clustered on trillions of randomly-shaped peptide scaffolds, and the most HIV-like glycopeptides are selected from the pool using antibody bait. Using both of these methods, carbohydrate clusters have been discovered which are recognized by HIV antibodies as tightly as is the authentic viral protein. Such molecules are thus of great interest as HIV vaccine candidates.

Wed 4/15/15 4 pmGerstenzang 121
Joint Biology/Neuroscience Colloquium
Jennifer Doudna (UC Berkeley )
The World of CRISPRS: From Biology to Technology
Hosted by Michael Marr

Thu 4/16/15 12 noonLurias, Hassenfeld Conference Center
Psychology Department Colloquium (Boston Roybal Center for Active Lifestyle Interventions. NIA cognitive Aging in social Context Training Grant, NIGMS Brain, Body & Behavior Training Grant)
Hazel Markus (Stanford University)
Inequality, Social Class and Self
The U.S. is increasingly marked by inequality and divided along social class lines. The divide is evident in what eat for dinner, how we parent, how we vote, and how long we live. In this talk I integrate many of the powerful and previously unexamined psychological consequences of social class, suggesting that societal rank has its influence on behavior through one's experience of self. In North American settings, those with higher rank (whether measured or manipulated) tend to experience themselves as independent selves--as separate from others, as expressing and promoting their own interests, choices and goals, and as influencing and controlling social interactions. Those with lower rank tend to experience themselves as interdependent selves--as connected with others, as responsive to the social situation and to others' goals, emotions and needs, and as adjusting and deferring to others in interaction. The more unequal we become and the more different our selves, the more societal dysfunction we will experience. Addressing inequality in health, education, and political engagement requires policies and practices that bridge these socioculturally shaped differences in self.

Hosted by Margie Lachman

Thu 4/16/15 4 pmAbelson 229
MRSEC Seminar
Tony Gao (Courant Institute, NYU)
TBA
Hosted by Z. Dogic

Thu 4/16/15 4:30 pmGoldsmith 317
Joint Mathematics Colloquium
Mikhail Khovanov (Columbia University)
Categorification at a prime root of unity
Hosted by Bong Lian

Fri 4/17/15 11:15 amAbelson 131
Biochemistry-Biophysics Friday Lunchtime Pizza Talks
Hiro Furukawa (Cold Spring Harbor)
Hosted by Prof. Miller

Fri 4/17/15 12:30 pmGerstenzang 123
Molecular and Cell Biology & Neuroscience Student Seminars
Narendra Mukherjee (Katz Lab)
David Waterman (Haber Lab)

Fri 4/17/15 3 pmvolen 201
Cognitive Neuroscience Journal Club
TBD
TBD

Fri 4/17/15 4 pmGerstenzang 121
Chemistry Department Colloquium
Michael Findlater (Texas Tech)
Sustainable Transformations using Earth Abundant Metals
Hosted by Casey Wade

Mon 4/20/15 11 amAbelson 307
String Theory Seminar
Tracy Slatyer (MIT)
GeV Gamma-Rays from the Central Milky Way and the Case for Annihilating Dark Matter
Hosted by Albion Lawrence

Mon 4/20/15 11 amVolen 201
Computational Neuroscience Journal Club
( )
No Journal Club
No Journal Club due to Patriots Day Holiday

Mon 4/20/15 12 noonRosenstiel 118
Molecular Genetics Journal Club
( )
No Journal Club: Patriots Day
No Journal Club: Patriots Day

Mon 4/20/15 4 pmGerstenzang 121
Chemistry Department Colloquium
( )
No Colloquium: Patriots Day

Tue 4/21/15 12:30 pmGerstenzang 121
Neurobiology Journal Club
Michael Long (NYU)
TBA
Hosted by Prof. Van Hooser

 
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