Seminars

Upcoming Seminars / Seminars This Week

Wed 9/20/17 9 amBassine 208
Safety Training
Robin Bell (Radiation Safety Office)
Radiation Safety

Wed 9/20/17 12 noonRosenstiel 118
Neurobiology Journal Club
Mark Zielinski (Jadhav Lab)
Mapping of a non-spatial dimension by the hippocampal-entorhinal circuit
Ref: Aronov, D., Nevers, R., & Tank, D. W. (2017). Nature, 543(7647), 719--722.

https://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v543/n7647/pdf/nature21692.pdf

Alexis Johns (Wingfield Lab)
Neural decoding of attentional selection in multi-speaker environments without access to clean sources
Ref: O'Sullivan, J., Chen, Z., Herrero, J., McKhann, G. M., Sheth, S. A., Mehta, A. D., & Mesgarani, N. (2017). Neural decoding of attentional selection in multi-speaker environments without access to clean sources. Journal of neural engineering, 14(5), 056001.

http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1741-2552/aa7ab4/meta


Fri 9/22/17 9:30 amShapiro Campus Center Theater
New England Complex Fluids Workshop
Mark Bathe (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Programming Functional DNA Nanoparticles
Registration (free) required: http://complexfluids.org no later than 8am, September 20th
Hosted by Seth Fraden

Fri 9/22/17 10:15 amShapiro Campus Center Theater
New England Complex Fluids Workshop
Marc-Antoine Fardin (Paris Diderot University)
Rheology with 3 Time Scales
Registration (free) required: http://complexfluids.org no later than 8am, September 20th
Hosted by Seth Fraden

Fri 9/22/17 12:30 pmGerstenzang 123
Molecular and Cell Biology & Neuroscience Student Seminars
Gonen Memisoglu (Haber Lab)
Narendra Mukherjee (Katz Lab)

Fri 9/22/17 3 pmShapiro Campus Center Theater
New England Complex Fluids Workshop
Laura Bradley (University of Massachusetts, Amherst)
Seeded Emulsion Polymerization for Non-Spherical Particles and Clickable Janus Colloids
Registration (free) required: http://complexfluids.org no later than 8am, September 20th
Hosted by Seth Fraden

Fri 9/22/17 3:45 pmShapiro Campus Center Theater
New England Complex Fluids Workshop
Xuanhe Zhao (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Soft Living Materials and Machines
Registration (free) required: http://complexfluids.org no later than 8am, September 20th
Hosted by Seth Fraden

Mon 9/25/17 11 amVolen 201
Computational Neuroscience Journal Club
Uri Eden ( Boston University)
State-space modeling of neural spiking systems
Hosted by Ryan Young

Mon 9/25/17 12 noonRosenstiel 118
Molecular Genetics Journal Club
Jacqueline McDermott (Paradis Lab)
Therapeutically targeting glypican-2 via single-domain antibody-based chimeric antigen receptors and immunotoxins in neuroblastoma
Weijin Xu (Rosbash Lab)
Cell-Type-Specific Translation Profiling Reveals a Novel Strategy for Treating Fragile X Syndrome

Mon 9/25/17 4 pmGerstenzang 121
Chemistry Department Colloquium
Alexander Radosevich (MIT)
Distorted Tricoordinate Phosphorus Compounds as Biphilic Catalysts
Hosted by Deng/Krauss

Tue 9/26/17 12:30 pmGerstenzang 121
Joint Biology/Neuroscience Colloquium
Thomas Martin (University of Wisconsin-Madison )
Multiple roles for priming proteins (CAPS, Munc13) in Ca2+-dependent membrane fusion
Hosted by Leslie Griffith

Tue 9/26/17 3 pmShapiro Science Center GL14
Thesis Seminar
Rong Zhou (Xu Lab)
Systematic Approaches to Study Enzyme Instructed Self-Assembly of Small Molecule Hydrogelator and their Application in Dynamic Microenvironment

Tue 9/26/17 3 pmVolen 101
Thesis Seminar (Graduate Program in Computer Science)
Kyriaki Dimitriadou (Papaemmanouil Group)
Learning-based Interactive Data Exploration
In this thesis, we propose that database systems should be augmented with an automated data exploration service that methodically steers users through the data in a meaningful way. Such an automated system is crucial for deriving insights from complex datasets found in many big data applications such as scientific and healthcare applications as well as for reducing the human effort of data exploration. Towards this end, we designed AIDE, an Automatic Interactive Data Exploration framework that assists users in discovering new interesting data patterns and eliminates expensive ad-hoc exploratory queries. AIDE relies on a seamless integration of classification algorithms and data management optimization techniques that collectively strive to accurately learn the user interests based on his relevance feedback on strategically collected samples. We present a number of exploration techniques as well as optimizations that minimize the number of samples presented to the user while offering interactive performance. AIDE can deliver highly accurate query predictions for very common conjunctive queries with small user effort while, given a reasonable number of samples, it can predict with high accuracy complex disjunctive queries. It provides interactive performance as it limits the user wait time per iteration of exploration to less than a few seconds.

Tue 9/26/17 4 pmAbelson 131
Physics Department Colloquium
Dapeng Bi (Northeastern University)
Mechanics of Epithelial Tissues: Structure, Rigidity and Fluidity
Abstract: Cells must move through tissues in many important biological processes, including embryonic development, cancer metastasis, and wound healing. Often these tissues are dense and a cell's motion is strongly constrained by its neighbors, leading to glassy dynamics. Although there is a density-driven glass transition in particle-based models for active matter, these cannot explain liquid-to-solid transitions in confluent tissues, where there are no gaps between cells and the packing fraction remains fixed and equal to unity. I will demonstrate the existence of a new type of rigidity transition that occurs in confluent tissue monolayers at constant density. The onset of rigidity is governed by a model parameter that encodes single-cell properties such as cell-cell adhesion and cortical tension. I will also introduce a new model that simultaneously captures polarized cell motility and multicellular interactions in a confluent tissue and identify a glassy transition line that originates at the critical point of the rigidity transition. This work suggests an experimentally accessible structural order parameter that specifies the entire transition surface separating fluid tissues and solid tissues.

Speaker Bio: BS in Physics from Binghamton University

PhD in Physics from Brandeis (2012), advisor Bulbul Chakraborty

Postdoc at Syracuse University (2012-2015)

Independent Fellow at Rockefeller University (2015-2016)

Started as assistant professor at Northeastern Jan 2017

Hosted by Bulbul Chakraborty

Wed 9/27/17 10:30 amAbelson 333
Thesis Seminar (Graduate Program in Physics)
Mahsa Siavashpouri (Dogic Lab)
Molecular engineering of colloidal liquid crystals using DNA origami and filamentous viruses

Wed 9/27/17 12 noonRosenstiel 118
Neurobiology Journal Club
Narendra Mukherjee (Katz Lab)
Learning enhances sensory processing in mouse V1 before improving behavior
Ref: Jurjut, Ovidiu and Georgieva, Petya and Busse, Laura and Katzner, Steffen

http://www.jneurosci.org/content/early/2017/05/30/JNEUROSCI.3485-16.2017

Lauren Tereshko (Sengupta Lab)
Primary Cilia Signaling Shapes the Development of Interneuronal Connectivity
Ref: Guo et al 2017 Developmental Cell

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.devcel.2017.07.010


Wed 9/27/17 1 pmShapiro Science Center 3-37
Thesis Seminar
Chen Bai (Herzfeld Lab)
Aspects of a polarizable and reactive force field based on semi-classical electrons

Thu 9/28/17 12 noonMultipurpose Room (SSC)
Psychology Department Colloquium (NIGMS Brain, Body & Behavior Training Grant NIA Cognitive Aging in Social Context Training Grant)
Lynn Hasher, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology (University of Toronto Senior Scientist, Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest Centre)
The Benefits of Poor Cognitive Control
Although the ability to control the focus of attention in a top-down manner provides advantages across a range of tasks that have been at the center of interest to cognitive psychologists, there are other, perhaps less studied tasks which benefit from a less tightly regulated, broader focus of attention. This talk will highlight the benefits of reduced cognitive control using healthy aging as a model, with a few references to findings on time of day and mood effects since these too are also associated with differences in reliance on control even in young adults.

Hosted by Bob Sekuler

Thu 9/28/17 2 pmAbelson 333
Theory IGERT Seminar
Arjun Narayanan (MIT)
A First Order Phase Transition Underlies the Formation of Sub-Diffractive Protein Aggregates in Mammalian Cells
Hosted by Albion Lawrence / Kabir Ramola

Thu 9/28/17 2 pmLown 002
Thesis Seminar (Graduate Program in Psychology)
Stephanie A. Robinson (PhD candidate, Life Span Lab)
Perceived Control and Cognition: A Multimethod Approach to Exploring Physical Activity as a Mechanism
Perceived control has been linked to enhanced cognitive health, however only recently have the mechanisms involved in this relationship been explored. One proposed mechanism is physical activity, as it is a well-established correlate of both perceived control and cognitive performance. Because physical activity, perceived control, and cognition all tend to decline with age, it is necessary to understand the possible mechanisms that can inform the development of interventions to help ameliorate such age-related declines. The objective of this research was to further understand the relationship and directionality between perceived control, physical activity, and cognitive health.

Study 1 investigated long-term changes in this mediational relationship across 20 years in middle-aged and older adults (24 -- 75 years) using the Midlife in the United States study (N=7108). Results of Study 1 showed that one's level of and change in perceived control predicted cognition 10 and 20 years later, and that this was mediated by level of and change in physical activity. Study 2 examined this relationship from a short-term, daily perspective over 7 days in a lifespan sample of adults (N=145, ranging from 22 to 95 years). Results demonstrated that on days in which one perceived more control they were more likely to engage in more physical activity, and on days in which one engaged in more physical activity they were more likely to demonstrate better cognitive functioning. Daily physical activity mediated the daily relationship between perceived control and cognition. Study 3 used an experimental approach to examine the relationships between perceived control, physical activity, and cognition with a 5-week implementation intention intervention that focused on reducing the perception of time-related constraints to engaging in physical activity in a sample of middle-aged adults (N=63, 35 -- 69 years old). Participants were randomly assigned to either a control or intervention condition. Both conditions received a Fitbit to objectively measure their physical activity. After a one-week baseline, those in the intervention condition received the implementation intention intervention which had them prospectively plan how, where, and when they would add physical activity to their daily routine. Results revealed that those in the intervention condition significantly increased in steps and time spent in moderate and vigorous physical activity. Additionally, the intervention condition demonstrated a significant increase in time-relevant exercise self-efficacy from pre- to post-test. This increase in time-relevant exercise self-efficacy was significantly related to a reduction in perceiving time as a barrier, as well as step goal achievement. There were no significant differences in cognition across time or between conditions, nor any direct or indirect effects between changes in perceived control, physical activity, or cognition.

Overall, the results of this project demonstrate that physical activity acts as a mechanism in the relationship between perceived control and cognitive performance on both a long- and short-term basis. While we were unable to find evidence of this mediational relationship in our experimental paradigm, we were able to successfully increase participants' confidence in their ability to exercise under time-related constraints, as well as their engagement in physical activity. Our results support the relationship between perceived control and physical activity, and that physical activity plays a mediational role in the relationship between perceived control and cognition. Future work should continue developing and investigating experimental paradigms in which perceived control, physical activity, and cognition can be maintained and/or enhanced in adulthood.

Hosted by Margie Lachman

Thu 9/28/17 4 pmAbelson 229
MRSEC Seminar
Ian Wong (Brown University)
Beyond 2D: Self-Organizing Patterns in Nanomaterials and Cancer

Fri 9/29/17 11:15 amRosenstiel 118
Biochemistry-Biophysics Friday Lunchtime Pizza Talks
Brian Kelch (UMass Medical School)
Motors, rings, springs and things: macromolecular machines on DNA
Hosted by Timo Street

Fri 9/29/17 12:30 pmGerstenzang 123
Molecular and Cell Biology & Neuroscience Student Seminars
Dan Powell (Marder Lab)
ShiYu Wang (Rodal Lab)

Fri 9/29/17 2 pmGerstenzang 121
Thesis Seminar (Graduate Program in Biochemistry and Biophysics)
Richard Roy (Theobald Lab)
Bayesian optimization of structure-based multiple alignment and superposition

Mon 10/2/17 12 noonRosenstiel 118
Molecular Genetics Journal Club
Denise Hilton (Goode Lab)
TBA
David Waterman (Haber Lab)
Actin protects mammalian eggs against chromosome segregation errors
Ref: Science, 8/25/2017

Mon 10/2/17 4 pmGerstenzang 121
Chemistry Department Colloquium
Mike McBride (Yale)
Viedma Ripening: How a New Old Mechanism of Crystal Growth Achieves Efficient Deracemization
Hosted by Bruce Foxman

Wed 10/4/17 12 noonRosenstiel 118
Neurobiology Journal Club
David Levitan (Nelson/Katz Labs)
TBA
Nathanial Miska (Turrigiano Lab)
TBA

Fri 10/6/17 12:30 pmGerstenzang 123
Molecular and Cell Biology & Neuroscience Student Seminars
Tom Rands (Goode Lab)
Shen Wang (VanHooser)

Tue 10/10/17 12:30 pmGerstenzang 121
Joint Biology/Neuroscience Colloquium
Jason Shepherd (University of Utah)
Retroviral origins of synaptic plasticity
Hosted by Avi Rodal

Tue 10/10/17 4 pmAbelson 131
Physics Department Colloquium
Tulika Bose (Boston University)
TBA

Wed 10/11/17 12 noonLurias, Hassenfeld Conference Center
Psychology Department Colloquium (NIGMS Brai, Body & Behavior Training Grant NIA Cognitive Aging in Social Context Training Grant)
Mark J. Shelhamer, Sc.D. (Johns Hopkins University)
Human Health and Performance for a Mission to Mars: How NASA Does It, How NASA Should Do It
TBA
Hosted by James Lackner

Thu 10/12/17 4 pmAbelson 229
MRSEC Seminar
John Berezney (Dogic Lab)
TBA

Fri 10/13/17 12:30 pm
Molecular and Cell Biology & Neuroscience Student Seminars
NO PIZZA TALKS - QB RETREAT

Mon 10/16/17 4 pmGerstenzang 121
Chemistry Department Colloquium
Wenshe Liu (Texas A&M University)
Using an Expanded Genetic Code to Study Epigenetic Modifications
Hosted by Isaac Krauss

Tue 10/17/17 12:30 pmGerstenzang 121
Joint Biology/Neuroscience Colloquium
Manuel Garber (University of Massachusetts Medical School)
100 million years of regulatory changes: Charting the evolution of enhancers and long noncoding RNAs
Hosted by Sebastian Kadener

Tue 10/17/17 4 pmAbelson 131
Physics Department Colloquium
Elizabeth Blanton (Boston University)
TBA
Hosted by John Wardle

Wed 10/18/17 12 noonRosenstiel 118
Neurobiology Journal Club
Johanna Adams (Griffith Lab)
TBA
Maxium Bushmakin (Sekuler)
TBA

Wed 10/18/17 4 pmGerstenzang 121
Gabbay Award Lectures in Biotechnology and Medicine
James J. Collins (M.I.T.)
Synthetic Biology: Life Redesigned
Synthetic biology is bringing together engineers, physicists and

biologists to model, design and construct biological circuits out of

proteins, genes and other bits of DNA, and to use these circuits to

rewire and reprogram organisms. These re-engineered organisms are

going to change our lives in the coming years, leading to cheaper

drugs, rapid diagnostic tests, and synthetic probiotics to treat

infections and a range of complex diseases. In this talk, we

highlight recent efforts to create synthetic gene networks and

programmable cells, and discuss a variety of synthetic biology

applications in biotechnology and biomedicine.

Hosted by Dagmar Ringe

Thu 10/19/17 12 noonInternational Lounge, Usdan
Psychology Department Colloquium (NIGMS Brain, Body & Behavior Training Grant NIA Cognitive Aging in Social Context Training Grant)
Sharon L. Thompson-Schill, Ph.D. (University of Pennsylvania)
Learning Abstract Properties of Object Concepts
Over several decades, my group has attempted to understand the processes by which new conceptual knowledge is acquired and the neural changes that support concept acquisition. For most of these years, we have investigated the representation of physical features of object concepts, such as their colors or their shapes. Recently, we have turned to the question of how we learn and represent abstract information about concepts. I will describe several examples, still in their infancy, of this line of work. In one set of studies, we have explored the integration of visual and abstract object properties during learning. In another, we have asked whether we can learn abstract knowledge about object function from event structure. And in a third, we have examined the influences of the broader network architecture on the acquisition of conceptual knowledge. Central to all of these investigations is the goal of understanding cognitive and neural systems that support acquisition and representation of abstract properties of object concepts as well as the link between abstract properties and physical properties of object concepts, both of which are needed to form a complete representation of object concepts.
Hosted by Hannah Snyder

Thu 10/19/17 2 pmAbelson 333
Theory IGERT Seminar
Eric Lowet (Boston University)
TBA
Hosted by Albion Lawrence / Kabir Ramola

Thu 10/19/17 4:30 pmGoldsmith 317
Mathematics Joint Colloquium
Colleen Robles (Duke University)
TBA
Hosted by Prof. An Huang

Fri 10/20/17 11:30 amRosenstiel 118
Biochemistry-Biophysics Friday Lunchtime Pizza Talks
Robert Sauer (MIT)
Structure and Function of AAA+ Proteases
Hosted by Chris Miller

Fri 10/20/17 12:30 pmGerstenzang 123
Molecular and Cell Biology & Neuroscience Student Seminars
Joe Wachutka (Katz Lab)
Denise Hilton (Goode Lab)

Fri 10/20/17 3 pmVolen 201
Cognitive Neuroscience Journal Club
Wanbing Zhang (Gutchess Lab)
TBA

Mon 10/23/17 4 pmGerstenzang 121
Chemistry Department Colloquium
Masayuki Wasa (Boston College)
Enantioselective Transformation of Unreactive Molecules by Frustrated Acid/Base Catalysts
Hosted by Li Deng

Tue 10/24/17 12:30 pmGerstenzang 121
Joint Biology/Neuroscience Colloquium
Brooke McCartney (Carnegie Mellon University)
TBA
Hosted by Bruce Goode

Tue 10/24/17 4 pmAbelson 131
Physics Department Colloquium
TBA
TBA

Wed 10/25/17 12 noonRosenstiel 118
Neurobiology Journal Club
Inna Nechipurenko (Sengupta)
TBA
Daniel Powell (Marder Lab)
TBA

Fri 10/27/17 11:15 amRosenstiel 118
Biochemistry-Biophysics Friday Lunchtime Pizza Talks (Cosponsored by the Quantitative Biology Program)
Michael Poirier (Ohio State University)
TBA
Hosted by Jeff Gelles (Biochemistry)

Fri 10/27/17 12:30 pmGerstenzang 123
Molecular and Cell Biology & Neuroscience Student Seminars
Jackie McDermott (Paradis Lab)
Madelen Diaz (Rosbash Lab)

Mon 10/30/17 11 amVolen 201
Computational Neuroscience Journal Club
Ivan De Araujo ( Yale University)
Circuit Organization of the Gut-Brain Axis
Gut-generated signals function as major modulators of motivated and emotional behaviors. The presentation will describe a pathway via which sensory cells of the gastrointestinal tract connect to the brain's reward systems. It will also explore a second pathway that allows these gut sensory cells to engage the motor brain systems controlling the craniofacial musculature.

Hosted by Chenghao Liu

 
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