Seminars

Upcoming Seminars / Seminars This Week

Fri 11/27/20 12:30 pmOnline
Molecular and Cell Biology & Neuroscience Student Seminars
NO PIZZA TALK - THANKSGIVING BREAK

Mon 11/30/20 2 pmOnline
Neurobiology Journal Club
Jasmine Le (Rosbash Lab)
A circadian rhythm-gated subcortical pathway for nighttime-light-induced depressive-like behaviors in mice
Ref: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41593-020-0640-8
Mara Rue (Marder Lab)
Molecular Basis of Chemotactile Sensation in Octopus
Ref: https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(20)31149-1?utm_source=EA
https://brandeis.zoom.us/j/98089933618 For pw please email: aesposito@brandeis.edu

Mon 11/30/20 4 pmVirtual (Zoom)
Chemistry Department Colloquium
Christopher Uyeda (Purdue University)
Catalysis at Metal-Metal Bonds
https://brandeis.zoom.us/j/96036615412 Please email chemofc@brandeis.edu from your Brandeis email account for the password.
Hosted by Hao Xu

Tue 12/1/20 12:30 pmOnline
Joint Biology/Neuroscience Colloquium (Neuro Training Grant Hosted Speaker)
Jesse Goldberg (Cornell University)
Actor Critic Reinforcement Learning in the Songbird
https://brandeis.zoom.us/j/97005395635 For pw please email aesposito@brandeis.edu
Hosted by Anthony Maggard

Tue 12/1/20 2 pmVirtual (Zoom)
Topology Seminar
Carolyn Abbott (Columbia University )
Free products and random walks in acylindrically hyperbolic groups
Abstract: The properties of a random walk on a group which acts on a hyperbolic metric space have been well-studied in recent years. In this talk, I will focus on random walks on acylindrically hyperbolic groups, a class of groups which includes mapping class groups, Out(F_n), and right-angled Artin and Coxeter groups, among many others. I will discuss how a random element of such a group interacts with fixed subgroups, especially so-called hyperbolically embedded subgroups. In particular, I will discuss when the subgroup generated by a random element and a fixed subgroup is a free product, and I will also describe some of the geometric properties of that free product. This is joint work with Michael Hull.
https://brandeis.zoom.us/j/99772088777 Password: hyperbolic
Hosted by Profs. Daniel Ruberman and Ruth Charney

Tue 12/1/20 4 pmVirtual (Zoom)
Physics Department Colloquium
Juan Perilla (University of Delaware)
TBA
Hosted by Michael Hagan

Wed 12/2/20 10 amOnline
Computational Neuroscience Journal Club
Paul Miller & Don Katz (Brandeis University)
Discussion of: “Against the Epistemological Primacy of the Hardware: The Brain from Inside Out, Turned Upside Down” Versus “The brain-cognitive behavior problem: a retrospective
https://brandeis.zoom.us/j/96016650028 For password or to be added to the listserv, please email: pmiller@brandeis.edu

Wed 12/2/20 2 pmOnline
Molecular Genetics Journal Club
Michael O'Donnell (Rosbash-Abovich Award Winner)
Microbial mind control: bacterially produced neuromodulators alter C. elegans olfactory behavior
https://brandeis.zoom.us/j/99047466182 For pw please email: aesposito@brandeis.edu

Wed 12/2/20 3:30 pmVirtual (Zoom)
Thesis Seminar (Graduate Program in Molecular and Cell Biology)
Danielle Gallagher (Haber Lab)
A Tale of Two Strands: The Asymmetry of DNA Double Strand Break Repair
https://brandeis.zoom.us/j/94653194535, please email scigradoffice@brandeis.edu for password

Fri 12/4/20 12:15 pmVirtual (Zoom)
New England Dynamics and Number Theory Seminar
Osama Khalil (University of Utah)
Large centralizers and counting integral points on affine varieties
Duke-Rudnick-Sarnak and Eskin-McMullen initiated the use of ergodic methods to count integral points on affine homogeneous varieties. They reduced the problem to one of studying limiting distributions of translates of periods of reductive groups on homogeneous spaces. The breakthrough of Eskin, Mozes and Shah provided a rather complete understanding of this question in the case the reductive group has a "small centralizer" inside the ambient group. In this talk, we describe work in progress giving new results on the equidistribution of generic translates of closed orbits of semisimple groups with "large centralizers". The key new ingredient is an algebraic description of a partial compactification (for lack of a better word) of the set of intermediate groups which act as obstructions to equidistribution. This allows us to employ tools from geometric invariant theory to study the avoidance problem.
If you are interested in giving a talk or attending the seminar, please send an email to one of the organizers. We will give you the Zoom link and include you in the mailing list for future talks.
Hosted by Profs. Dmitry Kleinbock and Keith Merrill

Fri 12/4/20 12:30 pmOnline
Molecular and Cell Biology & Neuroscience Student Seminars
Meghan Harris (Marr Lab)
https://brandeis.zoom.us/j/92495098435?pwd=OVV0OU1OSlBGRWtNdE9vR0ZMT255UT09

Fri 12/4/20 3 pmVirtual (Zoom)
Thesis Seminar (Graduate Program in Neuroscience)
Justin Shin (Jadhav Lab)
Dynamics of Awake Hippocampal-Prefrontal Reactivation for Spatial Learning and Memory-Guided Decision Making
https://brandeis.zoom.us/j/99881142892, please email scigradoffice@brandeis.edu for password

Mon 12/7/20 2 pmOnline
Neurobiology Journal Club
NO TALK - FINALS

Tue 12/8/20 12:30 pmOnline
Joint Biology/Neuroscience Colloquium
NO SEMINAR - FINALS

Tue 12/8/20 2 pmVirtual (Zoom)
Topology Seminar
Yulan Qing (Fudan University)
The Large Scale Geometry of Big Mapping Class Groups
https://brandeis.zoom.us/j/99772088777 Password: hyperbolic
Hosted by Profs. Daniel Ruberman and Ruth Charney

Wed 12/9/20 11 amVirtual (Zoom)
Mathematical BIology Seminar
Alexandra Jilkine (University of Notre Dame)
TBA
https://brandeis.zoom.us/j/97088833036
Hosted by Profs. Jonathan Touboul,Thomas Fai & Dr. Ying Zhang

Fri 12/11/20 12:15 pmVirtual (Zoom)
New England Dynamics and Number Theory Seminar
Anthony Sanchez (University of Washington)
Gaps of saddle connection directions for some branched covers of tori
Holonomy vectors of translation surfaces provide a geometric generalization for higher genus surfaces of (primitive) integer lattice points. The counting and distribution properties of holonomy vectors on translation surfaces have been studied extensively. In this talk, we consider the following question: How random are the holonomy vectors of a translation surface? We motivate the gap distribution of slopes of holonomy vectors as a measure of randomness and compute the gap distribution for the class of translation surfaces given by gluing two identical tori along a slit. No prior background on translation surfaces or gap distributions will be assumed.
If you are interested in giving a talk or attending the seminar, please send an email to one of the organizers. We will give you the Zoom link and include you in the mailing list for future talks.
Hosted by Profs. Dmitry Kleinbock and Keith Merrill

Fri 12/11/20 12:30 pmOnline
Molecular and Cell Biology & Neuroscience Student Seminars
NO PIZZA TALKS - FINALS

Fri 12/11/20 2 pmOnline
Thesis Seminar (Graduate Program in Physics)
David Dodsworth (Blocker Lab)
Search for Supersymmetric Pseudo-Goldstini at sqrt(s) = 13 TeV with the ATLAS Detector
Contact scigradoffice@brandeis.edu for Zoom link and password

 
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