Seminars

Upcoming Seminars / Seminars This Week

Mon 8/29/16 11 amAbelson 307
String Theory Seminar
Gregory S. Adkins (Franklin & Marshall College)
Effective field theory based calculation of positronium energy levels
Positronium spectroscopy is of continuing interest as a high-precision test of our understanding of binding in QFT. Positronium represents the purest example of binding in QFT as the constituents are structureless and their interactions are dominated by QED with only negligible contributions from strong or weak effects. Consequently, positronium provides an ideal system for the development and exploration of modern methods for performing calculations of bound state properties, I will describe the application of the effective quantum field theory Non-Relativistic QED (NRQED) to the calculation of energy levels of positronium.
Hosted by Professor Richard Fell

Mon 8/29/16 11 amVolen 201
Computational Neuroscience Journal Club
John Lisman (Brandeis University )
The Rise and Demise of Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity
Pizza at noon

Mon 8/29/16 12 noonRosenstiel 118
Molecular Genetics Journal Club
Amy Lee (Biology Department)
Specialized role for eIF3 in transcript-specific translational control

Mon 8/29/16 4 pmGerstenzang 121
Chemistry Department Colloquium
Bart Kahr (New York University)
How to explain optical rotation to kids on the basis of the electronic structure of real molecules
Hosted by Bruce Foxman

Tue 8/30/16 10 amGeller Conference Room, Hassenfeld
Thesis Seminar (Graduate Program in Psychology)
Nicholas Brisbon (Lifespan Lab)
Mindfulness in Relation to Stress, Intrusive Thinking, Sleep Quality, and Memory

Tue 8/30/16 12:30 pmGerstenzang 121
Joint Biology/Neuroscience Colloquium (Genetics Training Grant Speaker)
Alfred Goldberg (Harvard Medical School)
New Insights into Proteasome Function: From Protein Degradation to Neurodegenerative Disease
Hosted by Genetics Training Grant Students

Wed 8/31/16 10:30 amGeller Conference Room, Hassenfeld
Thesis Seminar (Graduate Program in Psychology)
Salom Teshale (Lifespan Lab)
Short and Long-Term Change in Selective Optimization with Compensation Strategies and the Relationship to Well Being and Stress in Adulthood

Wed 8/31/16 12 noonRosenstiel 118
Neurobiology Journal Club
Meredith Blankenship (Katz Lab)
Multisensory integration in the developing tectum is constrained by the balance of excitation and inhibition
Ref: eLife (2016)
Yanxun Yu (Sengupta Lab)
Changes in the composition of brain interstitial ions control the sleep-wake cycle
Ref: Science. 2016 Apr 29;352(6285):550-5, from Nedergaard lab

Thu 9/1/16 12 noonShapiro Campus Center, Room 236
Psychology Department Colloquium (NIGMS Brain, Body & Behavior , NIA Cognitive Aging in Social Context)
Teresa M. Amabile, PhD (Harvard Business School)
Labor of Love: A Brief History of a Creativity Research Program
In this talk, I will describe the development and key findings of my 40-year program of research on the social psychology of creativity -- much of which was carried out during my years on the Brandeis psychology faculty (1977-1994). The research began with a series of laboratory experiments on child and adult participants, examining the effects of a number of social-environmental factors on artistic, verbal, and problem-solving creativity. In the aggregate, these studies demonstrated a number of ways to kill creativity by undermining intrinsic motivation. I'll describe how my research turned toward a search for ways to maintain and stimulate creativity, and from laboratory experiments to non-experimental studies inside organizations. Combined with the earlier experimental work, the findings from my more recent studies, which use surveys, interviews, and diaries, paint a much more complex -- but, I believe, more realistic -- picture of the psychology of creativity. This labor of love continues with my current work.

Hosted by Bob Sekuler

Fri 9/2/16 11:30 amVolen 201
Thesis Seminar (Graduate Program in Neuroscience)
Tony Ng (Paul Miller Lab)
The Mammalian Cortex as a Self-Organizing Complex System: Multi-Scale Homeostatic Approaches to Criticality via Dynamical Balance of Inhibition against Excitation

Fri 9/2/16 3 pmVolen 201
Computational Neuroscience Journal Club
John Beggs (Indiana University)
High-degree neurons feed cortical computations
Recent results have shown that functional connectivity among cortical neurons is highly varied, with a small percentage of neurons having many more connections than others. Also, new theoretical work makes it possible to quantify how neurons modify information from the connections they receive. These developments allow us to investigate how information modification, or computation, depends on the number of connections a neuron receives (in-degree) or sends out (out-degree). We used a high-density 512 electrode array to record spontaneous spiking activity from cortical slice cultures and transfer entropy to construct a network of information flow. We identified generic computations by the synergy produced wherever two information streams converged. We found that computations did not occur equally in all neurons throughout the networks. Surprisingly, neurons that computed large amounts of information tended to receive connections from high out-degree neurons. However, the in- degree of a neuron was not related to the amount of information it computed. To gain insight into these findings, we developed a simple feedforward network model. We found that a degree- modified Hebbian wiring rule best reproduced the pattern of computation and degree correlation results seen in the real data. Interestingly, this rule also maximized signal propagation in the presence of network-wide correlations, suggesting a mechanism by which cortex could deal with common random background input. These are the first results to show that the extent to which a neuron modifies incoming information streams depends on its topological location in the surrounding functional network.
special time and date
Hosted by Paul Miller

Tue 9/6/16 12:30 pmGerstenzang 121
Joint Biology/Neuroscience Colloquium (Life Sciences Distinguished Lecturer)
Patrick Brown (Impossible Foods, Inc.)
Replacing the world's most destructive technology
Hosted by Michael Rosbash

Tue 9/6/16 4 pmAbelson 131
Physics Department Colloquium
Aparna Baskaran (Brandeis University)
Active Materials: Applying the soft materials paradigm to Biology
In this talk I will introduce and discuss a recently developed class of microscopically driven materials that have been termed active materials. Drawing lessons from both biology and in vitro experimental systems, I will discuss theoretical challenges and different approaches that have proved fruitful so far. In particular, I will discuss the physics of active brownian particles and active nematics.
Hosted by Department of Physics

Wed 9/7/16 12 noonRosenstiel 118
Neurobiology Journal Club
Chang Liu (Griffith Lab)
Operation of a homeostatic sleep switch
Ref: Pimentel et al. Nature. 2016
Maxim Bushmakin (Sekuler Lab)
The speed of alpha-band oscillations predicts the temporal resolution of visual perception
Ref: Samaha, J., & Postle, B. R. (2015). Current Biology, 25(22), 2985-2990.

Thu 9/8/16 11 amAbelson 307
String Theory Seminar
Bogdan Stoica (Brandeis University)
Tensor networks, p-adic fields, and algebraic curves: arithmetic and the AdS_3/CFT_2 correspondence
Note special day of week
Hosted by Prof. Matthew Headrick

Thu 9/8/16 11 amVolen 201
Computational Neuroscience Journal Club
Daniel Acker (Brandeis University, Paradis Lab)
Pizza at noon

Thu 9/8/16 4 pmGerstenzang 121
Chemistry Department Colloquium
David Manke (University of Mass Dartmouth)
Ligand design in network solids
This is a Brandeis Monday
Hosted by Christine Thomas

Mon 9/12/16 11 amAbelson 307
String Theory Seminar
Gaston Giribet (ULB & Brandeis)
TBA
Hosted by Prof. Matthew Headrick

Mon 9/12/16 11 amVolen 201
Computational Neuroscience Journal Club
Jonathan Touboul (Collège de France)
Pizza at noon

Mon 9/12/16 12 noonRosenstiel 118
Molecular Genetics Journal Club
Efrat Shema (Massachusetts General Hospital)
Single-Molecule Epigenomics: Towards Cracking the 'Histone Code'
Hosted by Jim Haber

Mon 9/12/16 4 pmGerstenzang 121
Chemistry Department Colloquium
Aimin Liu (University of Texas, San Antonio)
Nature's sniper for remote tryptophan oxidation
Hosted by Liz Hedstrom

Tue 9/13/16 12:30 pmGerstenzang 121
M.R. Bauer Colloquium Series
Giovanni Bosco (Dartmouth)
Social learning and trans-generational inheritance of behavior in Drosophila: Revisiting Darwin's "gemmule" hypothesis
Hosted by Leslie Griffith

Tue 9/13/16 4 pmAbelson 131
Physics Department Colloquium
Albion Lawrence (Brandeis)
TBA
Hosted by Department of Physics

Tue 9/13/16 5 pmMandel Lounge
Special Seminar
Ruha Benjamin (Princeton University)
The Emperor’s New Genes: Science, Race, Justice, and the Allure of Objectivity
In this talk I discuss ongoing research on the way genomic science reflects, reinforces, and sometimes challenges racial and caste hierarchies. Drawing upon developments in the US, Mexico, South Africa, and India, I find the question of what the state owes particular groups increasingly connected to scientific definitions of 'what constitutes a group' in the first place. I argue that the epistemic and normative dexterity of the field -- not a strict enforcement of social hierarchy -- makes it powerful, problematic and, for some, profitable. Finally, I discuss the implications of this research for medical school pedagogy, work in the health sciences, and social justice movements more broadly.
Speaker Bio:

Ruha Benjamin specializes in the interdisciplinary study of science, medicine, and biotechnology; race-ethnicity and gender; health and biopolitics. She is assistant professor of African American Studies at Princeton University, and author of People’s Science: Bodies and Rights on the Stem Cell Frontier and numerous articles and book chapters that examine the relationship between innovation and equity, science and citizenship, health and justice. For more info visit: www.ruhabenjamin.com and https://blacktothefuture.princeton.edu.


Wed 9/14/16 12 noonRosenstiel 118
Neurobiology Journal Club
Peter Mitchell Bronk (Griffith Lab)
Structure of the voltage-gated K+ channel Eag1 reveals an alternative voltage sensing mechanism
Ref: J.R. Whicher and R. MacKinnon. Science, 12 Aug, 2016.
Adriane Otopalik (Marder Lab)

Thu 9/15/16 1 pmInternational Lounge, Usdan
Special Symposium
Brandeis Faculty
Provost's Research Innovation Grants: A Celebration of Accomplishment
The Office of the Provost for Research invites you to the Provost's Research Innovation Grants: A Celebration of Accomplishment, where recent Provost Research Grant recipients will present their work to date. Talks are scheduled from 1:00-1:45, 2:00 to 2:45, and 3:00 to 3:45, with posters presentations and refreshments at the end of each hour. The Brandeis community is invited to participate in discussion after brief talks and conversations with the poster presenters.
Hosted by Provost's Office

Mon 9/19/16 11 amVolen 201
Computational Neuroscience Journal Club
Chris Harvey (Harvard Medical School)
pizza at noon

Mon 9/19/16 11 amAbelson 307
String Theory Seminar
Brain Swingle (Brandeis & Harvard)
TBA
Hosted by Professor Matthew Headrick

Mon 9/19/16 12 noonRosenstiel 118
Molecular Genetics Journal Club
Cara Pina (Lovett Lab)
Brenda Lemos (Haber Lab)

Tue 9/20/16 12:30 pmGerstenzang 121
Joint Biology/Neuroscience Colloquium
Avital Rodal (Brandeis)
Routing and remodeling membranes at synapses

Tue 9/20/16 3:30 pmGerstenzang 122
Chemistry Department Colloquium
Stefan Stoll (University of Washington)
Mapping protein conformations using EPR spectroscopy
Hosted by Klaus Schmidt-Rohr

Tue 9/20/16 4 pmAbelson 131
Physics Department Colloquium
Chandralekha Singh (University of Pittsburgh)
Improving student understanding of quantum mechanics
Abstract: Learning quantum mechanics is challenging, in part due to the non-intuitive nature of the subject matter. Our research shows that the patterns of reasoning difficulties in learning quantum mechanics are often universal similar to the universal nature of reasoning difficulties found in introductory physics. Our research also shows that students often have difficulty in monitoring their learning while learning quantum mechanics. To help improve student understanding of quantum concepts, we are developing quantum interactive learning tutorials (QuILTs) as well as tools for peer-instruction. The goal of QuILTs and peer-instruction tools is to actively engage students in the learning process and to help them build links between the formalism and the conceptual aspects of quantum physics without compromising the technical content. I will discuss the effectiveness of these learning tools based upon assessment data.

Speaker Bio: Chandralekha Singh is a professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy and Founding Director of the Discipline-Based Science Education Research Center at the University of Pittsburgh. She is an expert on science education at the college level, and has done extensive research on peer instruction and overcoming conceptual difficulties in upper-level physics classes such as quantum mechanics. She is a Fellow of both the American Physical Society and the American Association of Physics Teachers, and was chair of the APS Forum on Education.

Hosted by Professor Matthew Headrick

Wed 9/21/16 12 noonRosenstiel 118
Neurobiology Journal Club
Mark Zielinski (Jadhov Lab)
Belinda Barbagallo (Garrity Lab)

Mon 9/26/16 11 amAbelson 307
String Theory Seminar
Andrew Strominger (Harvard)
TBA
Hosted by Professor Matthew Headrick

Mon 9/26/16 12 noonRosenstiel 118
Molecular Genetics Journal Club
Sebastian Lourido (Whitehead Institute)
Hosted by Liz Hedstrom

Mon 9/26/16 4 pmGerstenzang 121
Chemistry Department Colloquium
Frank Tsung (Boston College)
TBA
Hosted by Casey Wade

Tue 9/27/16 12:30 pmGerstenzang 121
Joint Biology/Neuroscience Colloquium
Stephen Van Hooser (Brandeis)
Choosing which way to go: the development of direction selectivity

Tue 9/27/16 4 pmAbelson 131
Physics Department Colloquium
TBA
TBA

Wed 9/28/16 12 noonRosenstiel 118
Neurobiology Journal Club
Philipp Rosenbaum (Marder Lab)
Thirst neurons anticipate the homeostatic consequences of eating and drinking
Ref: Zimmermann et al. 2016
Johanna Adams (Griffith Lab)

Thu 9/29/16 4 pmCarl J. Shapiro Theater, Shapiro Campus Center
Gabbay Award Lectures in Biotechnology and Medicine
Jeffery W. Kelly (The Scripps Research Institute)
The Chemistry and Biology of Adapting Proteostasis for Disease Intervention
Hosted by Dagmar Ringe

Mon 10/3/16 12 noonRosenstiel 118
Molecular Genetics Journal Club
Nevan Krogan (UCSF)
Host-Virus interactions
Hosted by Jim Haber

Tue 10/4/16 4 pm
Physics Department Colloquium
No colloquium (Rosh Hashanah)

Wed 10/5/16 12 noonRosenstiel 118
Neurobiology Journal Club
Vivekanand Vimal (Dizio Lab)
Parallel specification of competing sensorimotor control policies for alternative action options
Ref: Gallivan, Jason P., et al. Nature neuroscience (2016).
Alexis Johns (Wingfield Lab)

 
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